NIST Logo and ITL Banner Link to the NIST Homepage Link to the ITL Homepage Link to the NIST Homepage
Search CSRC:

NIST's Policy on Hash Functions

August 5, 2015

SHA-1: Federal agencies should stop using SHA-1 for generating digital signatures, generating time stamps and for other applications that require collision resistance. Federal agencies may use SHA-1 for the following applications: verifying old digital signatures and time stamps, generating and verifying hash-based message authentication codes (HMACs), key derivation functions (KDFs), and random bit/number generation. Further guidance on the use of SHA-1 is provided in SP 800-131A.

SHA-2 (i.e., SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA-512/224 and SHA-512/256): Federal agencies may use these hash functions for all applications that employ secure hash algorithms. NIST encourages application and protocol designers to implement SHA-256 at a minimum for any applications of hash functions requiring interoperability. Further guidance on the use of SHA-2 is provided in SP 800-57 Part 1, section 5.6.2 and SP 800-131A.

SHA-3 (i.e., SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, SHA3-512, SHAKE128 and SHAKE256): Federal agencies may use the four fixed-length SHA-3 algorithms—SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, and SHA3-512 for all applications that employ secure hash algorithms. The SHA-3 Extendable-Output Functions (XOFs), SHAKE128 and SHAKE256, can be specialized to hash functions, subject to additional security considerations. Guideline for using the XOFs will be provided in the future.

Currently there is no need to transition applications from SHA-2 to SHA-3.

NIST's Policy on Hash Functions dated March 2006.

NIST's Policy on Hash Functions dated September 2012.